Continuing Ed

Continuing Educational Opportunities

Pediatric Fracture Continuing Ed

For ASOP Members Only – Here’s an opportunity for 1 hour of Continuing Education credit to ASOP subscribers. Log-in and review the material. CommonPediatricFractures

 


There are no hypochondriacs in casts

Significant casting and splinting complications, although uncommon, can be more severe than many clinicians might anticipate. Even the most astute clinician may easily miss these complications. We present two cases of infectious life- or limb-threatening cast/splint complications presenting to a single pediatric emergency department (ED). We also review the pediatric and adult medical literature regarding such complications, and use…


Anatomy 5 for Members Only!

Members please use the link below to access the Anatomy 5 material. Anatomy 5


Medical Terminology Library Materials – Members Only

Dear ASOPER’s, Please use the link below to access the protected content of Medical Terminology Materials. Medical Terminology For ASOP


ASOP Casting and Bracing Hands-on Workshop

Course Curriculum Covers Orthopedic Casting & Fracture Bracing It is mission of this course to give each individual a learning experience that matches their abilities and experience.If you are new to orthopedics this course will jump start your career and make you a more valued member of your practice. If you have casting experience you will…


Nonoperative Management of Complete Lateral Elbow Ligamentous Disruption in an NFL Player

Disruptions of the lateral soft tissue restraints of the elbow, including the lateral ulnar collateral ligament, are a well-recognized clinical entity which may result in chronic elbow instability. When symptomatic, most authors recommend surgery to reconstruct the LUCL. We report on a case of a professional football player who sustained complete disruption of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex from the lateral humeral epicondyle with extension of his injury into his common extensor origin. He was treated conservatively and returned to play after 4 weeks. Treatment algorithm and a review of the literature are discussed.


Osteoarthritis of the knee

Osteoarthritis of the knee, a condition that affects more than four million Americans annually, occurs when degenerative changes develop in the cartilage that lines the knee joint.

The knee joint is a complex structure with three main compartments that have individual functions and structures: the inner (medial) compartment and the outer (lateral) compartments are formed by the articulation (or joining) of the lowest part of the thighbone (femur) and the highest part of the shinbone (tibia). The third compartment of the knee is formed by the kneecap (patella) and the front part of the femur and is called the “patello-femoral joint.”


Private & Semi-Private Workshops now available from ASOP

Private Casting Workshops Have 10 or more attendees and we will hold a workshop at your office. Semi-Private Workshop Have only 6 attendees? We will hold a course in your city. All attendees receive a free ASOP membership and the 6 month orthopedic home study course.  All students can take the ROT exam at no charge. ASOP workshops are…


Wrong Site Surgery

This week, the continuing education email is a little different. I think we are all on a team, and when one of us fails, we all fail. It is up to all of us to prevent wrong site surgery. Recently, some Florida professional medical boards have adopted a policy of requiring continuing education in wrong…


Ulnar Collateral Ligament Tear

(Gamekeeper’s Thumb, Skier’s Thumb) Ulnar collateral ligament tear represents 60 percent of upper limb problems in skiers and is frequently overlooked and underdiagnosed. It is important to diagnose complete tears early because results of early surgical repair (within two to three weeks of the injury) are superior to results of late repair. Untreated tears can…


Scaphoid Fracture

Scaphoid fracture is the most common fracture of the carpal bones. A fracture in the proximal or middle part of the scaphoid has an increased chance of nonunion because of the poor blood supply to these areas. A delay in diagnosis of one to two weeks increases the risk for nonunion. Your local ER &…


Registered Orthopedic Technologist (“ROT”) Certification!

The American Society of Orthopedic Professionals is now awarding the professional title, Registered Orthopedic Technologist, R.O.T., after completion of our new online examination. This exam is focused on orthopedic procedures, orthopedic terminology and patient safety. If you are doing casting & bracing, you should consider becoming a Registered Orthopedic Technologist. The exam is free to…


The Toe Plate for the Lower Extremity Cast

Jack Hart, ROT, OTC Charles Barocas, ROT, CO One of the more difficult modifications to a lower extremity cast is the toe plate or full foot extension.   Mostly used after surgery of the foot or ankle, the toe plate creates a more rigid platform for the foot and helps control inversion/eversion and rotation.  It also…


Are Serial Radiographs Needed in Torus Fractures in Children?

American Family Physician,  Feb 15, 2000 by Jeffrey T. Kirchner A torus, or “buckle,” fracture of the distal radius is a common type of fracture in children. The standard treatment for these nondisplaced fractures is casting for three to four weeks. Serial radiographs are often obtained, such as immediately after application of the cast and…


Focused rigidity casting: a prospective randomised study

A.P. COHEN and D.L. SHAW Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bradford Royal Infirmary, Duckworth Lane, Bradford, UK Focused rigidity casting was compared with standard casting in a randomised prospective study. Two hundred consecutive patients attending a fracture clinic were assigned to have either a standard cast consisting of synthetic or plaster of paris, or a focused…